Johnny Cash Museum

by Christy Ulmet

Johnny Cash Museum
Raymond Boyd/Getty Images

In a city brimming with fascinating venues and exhibits celebrating the lives of icons, the Johnny Cash Museum in Nashville stands out for its depth. Visitors can not only see stage costumes and awards, but also set pieces from his music videos, his own hand-written letters and lyrics, his instruments, and even his Bible.

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Ryman Auditorium official tour and history

by Christy Ulmet

Ryman Auditorium Nashville Tennessee

Courtesy of Ryman Auditorium; Photo by Albert Vecerka/Esto

The Ryman Auditorium, the fifth home of the Grand Ole Opry radio show and the birthplace of bluegrass music, is irrefutably a Nashville icon. It’s also one of Music City’s busiest, most prestigious venues, having hosted Johnny Cash, Willie Nelson, Minnie Pearl, Hank Williams, and Patsy Cline. See also: Jack White, Coldplay, Emmylou Harris, Louis Armstrong, Elvis Presley, Peter Frampton, a handful of U.S. presidents, and Charlie Chaplin.

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Nashville’s most over-the-top hotel

by Christy Ulmet

opryland.jpg

Photo by Werner Segarra

Like a city within a city, Nashville’s massive Gaylord Opryland Hotel comes with “everything in one place,” as its official slogan states. Clocking in with almost 3,000 rooms, 20 restaurants, and covering more than 700,000 square feet of meeting space, the idea behind this resort is that guests can have everything they need under a single roof. Continue reading

Rooted in Community

By Christy Ulmet

Jael Fuentes sits on the couch in the front room of her house, drinking a smoothie she made from organic fruits and vegetables. Through the window, she looks out at the North Hill community garden where she grew many of her ingredients.

Fuentes lives in the Chestnut Hill neighborhood, which borders Trevecca Nazarene University in Nashville, Tennessee, USA. Not only is Chestnut Hill one of the poorest areas in the city in terms of household income, but it is also one of the poorest in terms of access to nutrition. The area is considered a food desert. The closest stores are high-priced convenience shops with inadequate produce sections, but they are often the only option for those without reliable transportation. Continue reading